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» WrestlingClassics.com Message Board » Professional Wrestling & General Discussion '99-June '07 » BRUNO SAMMARTINO'S WORKOUT ROUTINE IN 1966

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Author Topic: BRUNO SAMMARTINO'S WORKOUT ROUTINE IN 1966
ClaytonMooreJr
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I finally found it for everyone that wanted it.I just finished reading Bruno's workout routine in the August 1966 of Joe Weider's Muscle Builder. Here it is in his exact words since the magazine interviewed him. Bruno stated he was 29 and weighed 260 pounds in the article.

Bench Press - 5-7 sets start at 135 go to 300 then 330 for 30 reps and keep working up to 500 for a single.(You heard right on the reps with 330)

Incline Dumbell Press - 5 sets of 5 reps using 150 pound dumbells

Incline Dumbell Laterals-5 sets of 5 reps using 125 pounder's

Squats- 8 sets 3-5 reps working up to 650 pounds

Curl- 10 sets of 10 reps start at 135 and go to 225 using cheat style

High Pulls (Cheat style) to 315

Upright Rows - 6 sets of 6-8 reps using 205 pounds

Bruno stated in the article that his best olympic lifts were:

Press 365
Snatch 270
Clean and Jerk 370

Bruno stated his best powerlifting lifts were:

Bench Press 545 with a two second pause
Deadlift 685
Squat 685

Muscle Builder asked Bruno who was the strongest wrestler he ever met. He replied Gorilla Monsoon at 392 pounds.

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-01-2002).]


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ron ripple
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Bruno's bench for his time was pretty darn good. His squats and deadlifts were also probably good at that time. However, since he weighed between 245 and 265 at that time (?), men of the same size could probably squat and deadlift more...they definitely could by the 1980's, but many of them were probably on steroids.
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Ranger63
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The 330lbs for 30 reps is quite incredible for the time period. I remember reading an old Muscle and Fitness mag about Sergio Oliva doing 315 for 50 reps in the bench for a warm up, which was unheard of at the time (late 60's), so Bruno was really in an elite class.
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From Parts Unknown
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That rep strength on the bench is something. During the NFL draft process, scouts consider a 300-pounder exceptionally strong if he can manage 30 reps with a 225-pound bar.


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Ranger63:
The 330lbs for 30 reps is quite incredible for the time period. I remember reading an old Muscle and Fitness mag about Sergio Oliva doing 315 for 50 reps in the bench for a warm up, which was unheard of at the time (late 60's), so Bruno was really in an elite class.

I saw Oliva train at Gold's when he made his first west coast appearance around 1969. Those reps were hyped in the magazines. I saw Oliva do 315 in the bench press for 30 reps and that was the maximum. After that he supersetted weighted wide grip chins with bench presses going up to 405 for 8 reps. Don't think he was near Bruno's mark for reps. I had heard the most Oliva ever did on a single rep was 500 and that was touch and go. In those days, Weider made so many claims for his champions, that I got to see first hand they were false. If Weider heard of a champion powerlifter performing a record, he would say his bodybuilders could do the same feat, which was untrue. If Bruno did these lift without steroids, then he may have been the strongest back then, because in 1967 Pat Casey was bench pressing 600 and he was not clean and that was some record back then. I watched Arnold spot Billy Graham around 1971 or 1972 when he did 585 in the bench touch and go. Had Bruno used steroids, his bench would have easily climbed to well over 600.Of course wrestlers in the 1960's were using steroids, so the questions would have been, did Bruno use them around this time.

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-01-2002).]


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Ranger63
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So tell me, did Sergio look as incredible in person as he did in the photos?
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Hammond Engler
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ClaytonMooreJr-

Just curious, you were around for a lot of this stuff that took place at gyms. Were you a powerlifter, bodybuilder, or ???

Not questioning the veracity of what you witnessed, but just wondering how you came to see this stuff, and great stuff, too. Thanks for sharing it.

Maybe you told the story previously, so sorry in advance if you've already addressed this.

Thanks,

Bill


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Ranger63
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quote:
Originally posted by Bill:
ClaytonMooreJr-

Just curious, you were around for a lot of this stuff that took place at gyms. Were you a powerlifter, bodybuilder, or ???

Not questioning the veracity of what you witnessed, but just wondering how you came to see this stuff, and great stuff, too. Thanks for sharing it.

Maybe you told the story previously, so sorry in advance if you've already addressed this.

Thanks,

Bill


DITTO


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Lee Wong
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Please don't consider this a flame because it certainly is not. Also, I'm a huge Bruno mark. HOWEVER.......Weider is notorious for publishing completely bogus workout routines and amounts of weight lifted. Weider is responsible for turning more kids off to bodybuilding than to helping the sport grow. Why??? Because month after month he would put these superhuman routines in his mags and newbies and intermediate bodybuilders would kill themselves trying to keep up. There is no way that the CNS can keep up with a workout like the one documented for Bruno. Could he rep out 30x with 330. Sure, I'll bet he could have done it once or twice, but certainly not on a regular basis. Powerlifting is based on lifting progressively heavier loads over a fairly long period of time (10-12 weeks). A persons CNS has to be built up as well as the muscles in order to hoist up such weight.Bruno was no doubt one of the strongest, but I have some serious problems with that routine.

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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Lee Wong:
Please don't consider this a flame because it certainly is not. Also, I'm a huge Bruno mark. HOWEVER.......Weider is notorious for publishing completely bogus workout routines and amounts of weight lifted. Weider is responsible for turning more kids off to bodybuilding than to helping the sport grow. Why??? Because month after month he would put these superhuman routines in his mags and newbies and intermediate bodybuilders would kill themselves trying to keep up. There is no way that the CNS can keep up with a workout like the one documented for Bruno. Could he rep out 30x with 330. Sure, I'll bet he could have done it once or twice, but certainly not on a regular basis. Powerlifting is based on lifting progressively heavier loads over a fairly long period of time (10-12 weeks). A persons CNS has to be built up as well as the muscles in order to hoist up such weight.Bruno was no doubt one of the strongest, but I have some serious problems with that routine.

Sorry Lee but former Mr. Olympia contender Harold Poole who wrestled briefly trained at the Mid City Gym when Bruno was around he verified this years ago on what he did after the article was published. The Magnificent Maurice also verified this around 1966 when he trained at the same gym. Bruno's strength was there and Cowboy Bill Watts will tell you so, when he trained with Bruno.However Bruno did not perform 33 reps with 330 all the time but did in fact do it in 1966. The routine was legit because it had pictures of Bruno performing the exercises in the magazine with the weights and the owner of the Mid City Gym spotting him. Mid City gym was where all the wrestlers and bodybuilders in Manhattan trained.

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-02-2002).]


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Bill:
ClaytonMooreJr-

Just curious, you were around for a lot of this stuff that took place at gyms. Were you a powerlifter, bodybuilder, or ???

Not questioning the veracity of what you witnessed, but just wondering how you came to see this stuff, and great stuff, too. Thanks for sharing it.

Maybe you told the story previously, so sorry in advance if you've already addressed this.

Thanks,

Bill


Bill,

Yes I was into powerlifting back then. Now in my fifties at 6'1" and 240 I can still slam up 365 on the bench press. In my heyday, I did 460 in the bench press. I trained at the Original Gold's in Venice and joined around 1967 and I was young but had worked out since I was 13. I saw them all train back then. Sergio Oliva was the most massive bodybuilder with the biggest pair of arms I had ever seen, even bigger than Billy Graham who was 6'4". Oliva was 5'9 1/2" and they taped his arms pumped at 23". Even today I have not seen anyone with bigger arms. I use to watch the great Pat Casey train and ask him for advice, which he gave me. I saw Arnold arrive in Venice and rise to fame over the years. I also saw so many wrestlers train at Gold's. Around 1967 Magnificent Maurice stopped in town and at 47 years old was in unbelievable shape and size. He was in great condition. I also was there in the summer of 1969 when Frank Zane moved to Venice with his wife. Zane, Draper and Arnold trained together. It was a golden era for bodybuilding back then. I even managed to go to Vince's Gym and watch Larry Scott train. Back in the late 60's, California was so far ahead of any other state in powerlifting and bodybuilding, except for New York

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-01-2002).]


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sav
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Clayton, do you have any good stories about Kenny Waller. He was a highschool teacher and football coach here in Louisville before moving out there. He was rumored to be a pretty rough charactor when he lived here after college. I would like to hear your thoughts.
quote:
Originally posted by ClaytonMooreJr:
Bill,

Yes I was into powerlifting back then. Now in my fifties at 6'1" and 240 I can still slam up 365 on the bench press. In my heyday, I did 460 in the bench press. I trained at the Original Gold's in Venice and joined around 1967 and I was young but had worked out since I was 13. I saw them all train back then. Sergio Oliva was the most massive bodybuilder with the biggest pair of arms I had ever seen, even bigger than Billy Graham who was 6'4". Oliva was 5'9 1/2" and they taped his arms pumped at 23". Even today I have not seen anyone with bigger arms. I use to watch the great Pat Casey train and ask him for advice, which he gave me. I saw Arnold arrive in Venice and rise to fame over the years. I also saw so many wrestlers train at Gold's. Around 1967 Magnificent Maurice stopped in town and at 47 years old was in unbelievable shape and size. He was in great condition. I also was there in the summer of 1969 when Frank Zane moved to Venice with his wife. Zane, Draper and Arnold trained together. It was a golden era for bodybuilding back then. I even managed to go to Vince's Gym and watch Larry Scott train. Back in the late 60's, California was so far ahead of any other state in powerlifting and bodybuilding, except for New York


[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-01-2002).]



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Crimson Mask I
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quote:
Originally posted by ClaytonMooreJr:
I even managed to go to Vince's Gym and watch Larry Scott train. Back in the late 60's, California was so far ahead of any other state in powerlifting and bodybuilding, except for New York

Claytin, I was never heavy into (lifting or) bodybuilding, but it always seemed to me Vince Gironda was the real visionary, groundbreaking guy. Your comments?

So long from the Sunshine State!

[This message has been edited by Crimson Mask I (edited 04-02-2002).]


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by sav:
Clayton, do you have any good stories about Kenny Waller. He was a highschool teacher and football coach here in Louisville before moving out there. He was rumored to be a pretty rough charactor when he lived here after college. I would like to hear your thoughts.

Waller was not only a legit tough guy but he proved it many times. I first saw him at Gold's around 1971 when he won the Mr. America contest. He was strong and was very athletic. He use to go to the football field with Roger Callard and run and throw the football. Roger was a great football player at Michigan State.Waller never put up with any crap from anyone and the bodybuilders at Gold's knew it. A few years ago Waller had a gym in a hotel that he owned and went on Judge Wapner's show because he physically threw a member out of the gym that was abusive. It would have been interesting if Waller had wrestled. He was an athlete and bodybuilder, and yes tough.

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-02-2002).]


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Crimson Mask I:
Claytin, I was never heavy into (lifting or) bodybuilding, but it always seemed to me Vince Gironda was the real visionary, groundbreaking guy. Your comments?

So long from the Sunshine State!

Vince Gironda was way ahead of his time years ago. All the equipment that Larry Scott sells on his website www.biophase.com was developed by Vince at his gym years ago. Scott refined those special pieces. Vince was to bodybuilding what Rheo H Blair was to nutrition, if you know who he was. Vince's ideas were very eccentric but they worked. One day during a workout at Vince's around 1969, a young man complained to Vince about certain movements he put him on. Vince jumped up from his desk, opened the cash door while taking the cigar out of his mouth and refunded the member's money and said "Goodbye Mister". It was either Vince's way or the highway. Vince had a wooden bench press, which was lousy and he did not believe in bench pressing. Vince and Rheo Blair use to be good friends. Vince carried Rheo Blair's Protein and Vince's theory on cream and protein came from Blair's ideas he developed in the fifties. The thing that made Vince a legend was his uncanny way of producing results. He did not like powerlifters at all. In his gym was so many pictures of movie stars he trained. Vince's father had been a stunt man in the movies. Vince was indeed years ahead of everyone else in his ideas. When Arnold first came to California in December 1968, Weider sent him to Vince to be trained but they did not see eye to eye, so Arnold moved his training to the original Gold's in Venice in 1969. Weider then contacted Dave Draper to be his partner and help him.


[This message has been edited by Crimson Mask I (edited 04-02-2002).]


[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-02-2002).]


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Hammond Engler
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Thank You, Clayton, for adding a very interesting perspective here.
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ron ripple
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quote:
Originally posted by Crimson Mask I:
Claytin, I was never heavy into (lifting or) bodybuilding, but it always seemed to me Vince Gironda was the real visionary, groundbreaking guy. Your comments?

So long from the Sunshine State!

[This message has been edited by Crimson Mask I (edited 04-02-2002).]


Mask, You're right about Vince Gironda. He was considered by many a real visionary. I read some of his articles and work outs. If I recall, he did not do squats but rather the seated leg extensions. I think they also dubbed him the "Iron Guru."


For Clayton: Agree with you about those powerlifters in CA! I lived there from 1977 to 1983 and dabbled in power lifting from 1981 to 1982. I was not very good, competing in the Novice and Class I categories at the 80 (about 182) and 90 (about 198) kilo classes. I particularly remember many power lifters in the Masters Category (over age 40) still lifting amazing amounts of weights, and I would venture to say most weren't even on steroids!


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sav
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Clayton, I don't want to be a pest, but I've never known anyone who actually trained alongside the guys I used to read about in the magazines. One last question--what ever happened to Robby Robinson and Denny Gable?
quote:
Originally posted by ClaytonMooreJr:
Waller was not only a legit tough guy but he proved it many times. I first saw him at Gold's around 1971 when he won the Mr. America contest. He was strong and was very athletic. He use to go to the football field with Roger Callard and run and throw the football. Roger was a great football player at Michigan State.Waller never put up with any crap from anyone and the bodybuilders at Gold's knew it. A few years ago Waller had a gym in a hotel that he owned and went on Judge Wapner's show because he physically threw a member out of the gym that was abusive. It would have been interesting if Waller had wrestled. He was an athlete and bodybuilder, and yes tough.


[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-02-2002).]



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Ranger63
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The most important thing I learned from reading Gironda's material was to attain maximum muscle pump in the shortest amount of time possible, then stop. According to Vince, anything after that is just overtraining or as Vince would call it "Overtonus". This contradicted the "20 sets per bodypart" fad at the time.

Then in the 80's, Vince more or less proved the "High intensity, Heavy Duty" concept craze was a sure way of injuring yourself and overtraining.

IMO, Vince's best student was Mohammed Makkawy. Up until Makkawy was trained by Vince, he had a rather smooth appearance. After working with Vince he became ripped and almost won the Olympia around 82-84.


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Lee Wong
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Clayton, great bench, especially for a tall guy. You would do very well in drug tested Masters bench meets. I've been lucky enough to have trained at Iron Island Gym with the great Ken Leistner. I still get 425 with a bench shirt. 99% of the boys train at Bev Francis's Golds Gym in Syosset when they work the Nassau Coliseum. It's funny, I've seen Kane train their at least a half a dozen times and every time the only thing he will do is one hour of cardio. Goldberg was quite strong. I saw him incline bench 455 for 8 reps. Believe it or not, Sid was another guy I never saw touch a weight but only did heavy cardio. I guess it made him run from first to third faster.
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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Lee Wong:
Clayton, great bench, especially for a tall guy. You would do very well in drug tested Masters bench meets. I've been lucky enough to have trained at Iron Island Gym with the great Ken Leistner. I still get 425 with a bench shirt. 99% of the boys train at Bev Francis's Golds Gym in Syosset when they work the Nassau Coliseum. It's funny, I've seen Kane train their at least a half a dozen times and every time the only thing he will do is one hour of cardio. Goldberg was quite strong. I saw him incline bench 455 for 8 reps. Believe it or not, Sid was another guy I never saw touch a weight but only did heavy cardio. I guess it made him run from first to third faster.

Lee,

I saw Sid Vicious train. He used 180 pound dumbells on bench presses flat, then when he finsihed would go over to the bench press and do 225 for 10 reps and 275 for 10 and that was as high as he could go. It is a small world. I am familiar with Iron Island Gym. Ask Ken about Rheo H Blair. I seem to remember he worked for Rheo around 1968 for one summer. He used Blairs Protein. When he first arrived in Los Angeles, he headed to Rheo's house where he slept on Rheo's lawn. I know Ken writes for Milo magazine owned by Randy Strossen. He will remember the good old days.Great bench for you also. I don not find may heavy lifters on this message board.

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-04-2002).]


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by sav:
Clayton, I don't want to be a pest, but I've never known anyone who actually trained alongside the guys I used to read about in the magazines. One last question--what ever happened to Robby Robinson and Denny Gable?

Answering these questions brings back the good days. Robinson got married years back to a blonde dutch woman and had moved and may still live overseas with a personal training and consultation business. He had entered Weider's Masters Mr. Olympia in previous years....Denny Gable was a different sort. I do not know him nor was impressed with hm years ago. He was a tall guy but took many steroids and was not strong. I remember myself doing flat dumbell flyes with 100's around 1974 and Gable was only using around 80's. When I slammed up 450 on the bench, he hung his head and walked away. He was not that strong and seemed to rely on steroids. Don't worry abour bothering me, I appreciate all of you on this board that would like questions that I can answer for you. Thanks to all and keep them coming. Clayton


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Lee Wong
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You know Clayton, it seems to me the guys from the 70's were much thicker and denser in their muscle mass. Nowadays the guys are in the top shows are coming in between 275 and 300 lbs. with single digit body fat but it really doesn't impress me. Did you ever see Casey Viator train? He supposedly was one of the stronger bodybuilders around. Ken Leistner sold his half of Iron Island about 3 years ago. He said he couldn't handle the meets anymore because of the attitudes. What a shame, he would really go out of his way to help and give advise.
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Ranger63
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quote:
Originally posted by Lee Wong:
it really doesn't impress me. Did you ever see Casey Viator train? He supposedly was one of the stronger bodybuilders around.

Lee, check out the current issue of Ironman, as they list the leg workout Arthur Jones took Casey through that evidently made Sergio Olivia sick when he "attempted" same.


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Lee Wong
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Very cool! Sounds like my kind of article. Thanks Ranger, I have to look out for that issue.
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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Lee Wong:
You know Clayton, it seems to me the guys from the 70's were much thicker and denser in their muscle mass. Nowadays the guys are in the top shows are coming in between 275 and 300 lbs. with single digit body fat but it really doesn't impress me. Did you ever see Casey Viator train? He supposedly was one of the stronger bodybuilders around. Ken Leistner sold his half of Iron Island about 3 years ago. He said he couldn't handle the meets anymore because of the attitudes. What a shame, he would really go out of his way to help and give advise.

I saw Casey Viator train around 1982 when he came to work for Joe Weider. He could incline bench press 400 for reps. He was a very heavy steroid user and strong back then. I heard today that he keeps his size using the roids but his strength and joints are gone. Someone saw him train in Florida where he lives and said he struggled with 315 for 10 reps in the squat. He once could do 500 for 15 reps with rest between sets. He also could only do 8 reps in the bench press with 300 using the smith machine and he is still on the roids. His strength and joints are gone after years of steroid abuse.


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Gotta give props to you 400lb bench guys, I worked up to 335, and since then my left shoulder gives out whenever I go heavy? It's injured I guess, but only effects me in the gymn? Been doing more reps with light weight lately...
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Hammond Engler
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quote:
Originally posted by ClaytonMooreJr:
I saw Casey Viator train around 1982 when he came to work for Joe Weider. He could incline bench press 400 for reps. He was a very heavy steroid user and strong back then. I heard today that he keeps his size using the roids but his strength and joints are gone. Someone saw him train in Florida where he lives and said he struggled with 315 for 10 reps in the squat. He once could do 500 for 15 reps with rest between sets. He also could only do 8 reps in the bench press with 300 using the smith machine and he is still on the roids. His strength and joints are gone after years of steroid abuse.

How do steroids wreck joints? Is it that too much muscle, more than the body can handle, causes ligament/tendon problems, like HHH's thigh muscle snapping off?

Also, do you guys think lifting heavy weights is a major contributor to joint problems later on?

I've heard old wrestlers talking about their counterparts who lifted heavy, and seem to think they could have avoided some of the arthritis if they hadn't gone as heavy. Are these types of joint problems common in older powerlifters?


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sav
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Clayton, what can you tell us about a guy named a Bill West? Also, as a former discus and hammer thrower, I was wondering if John Powell or George Frenn ever worked out at Gold's. Thanks for your time--Sav.
quote:
Originally posted by ClaytonMooreJr:
Answering these questions brings back the good days. Robinson got married years back to a blonde dutch woman and had moved and may still live overseas with a personal training and consultation business. He had entered Weider's Masters Mr. Olympia in previous years....Denny Gable was a different sort. I do not know him nor was impressed with hm years ago. He was a tall guy but took many steroids and was not strong. I remember myself doing flat dumbell flyes with 100's around 1974 and Gable was only using around 80's. When I slammed up 450 on the bench, he hung his head and walked away. He was not that strong and seemed to rely on steroids. Don't worry abour bothering me, I appreciate all of you on this board that would like questions that I can answer for you. Thanks to all and keep them coming. Clayton



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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by sav:
Clayton, what can you tell us about a guy named a Bill West? Also, as a former discus and hammer thrower, I was wondering if John Powell or George Frenn ever worked out at Gold's. Thanks for your time--Sav.

I worked out with both Bill "Peanuts" West and George Frenn. We use to cut jokes after our workouts. I was a young guy but very strong and they use to say "You really have potential". I later competed. I trained around them from 1967-1969 Bill West died awhile back I thought of a heart attack. I do not know about Frenn. George was a great hammer thrower and could really handle massive weights in side laterals with dumbells. In the early days, West was a great guy and always clowning. One workout I spotted him and he did 450 in the bench press, then he spotted me and I did 460.....The Original Gold's on Pacific Avenue in Venice was the home for powerlifters and bodybuilders during the 1960's. It was the greatest era to me after all these years. It was never crowded and we always saw people that came from all over the world to train or visit and see the great stars back then. Around 1968 one guy came in to Gold's and said "Can I join Vince Gironda just threw me out of his gym". Joe Gold replied why and he said "Because I would not stop doing heavy bench presses. Joe Gold said, "You have come to the right place for heavy training. All we require is for you to bring your sweat and desire".

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-05-2002).]


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by Bill:
How do steroids wreck joints? Is it that too much muscle, more than the body can handle, causes ligament/tendon problems, like HHH's thigh muscle snapping off?

Also, do you guys think lifting heavy weights is a major contributor to joint problems later on?

Bill I hope to answer yor questions. If steroids wreck your joints just ask Superstar Billy Graham who had to have his hip replaced and his bones were crushed and he had to use a cane to walk.Now he needs a new liver to survive. Steroids will indeed ruin your joints over the years. The reason wrestlers complain about heavy training is because getting slammed on your bones and trying to lift heavy do not mix. If you use steroids, it will be worse. I saw may wrestlers at Gold's years ago complain that getting slammed on their shoulder or back affected heavy lifting, but yet they continued. Heavy training does not ruin your joints, if you know what you are doing and take layoffs and train right. I am in my fifties and can still bench heavy, have no injuries or joint problems. Usually people abuse their body that by age 40, their joints are in bad shape. When you train in your 20's, you have to think if you want to train the same in way in your 40's. If you do, then you will think about these things.

Clayton.....

I've heard old wrestlers talking about their counterparts who lifted heavy, and seem to think they could have avoided some of the arthritis if they hadn't gone as heavy. Are these types of joint problems common in older powerlifters?



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MikeWest
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This is a fascinating thread..Ive always suspected that a lot of the bodybuilder-type wrestlers arent nearly as strong as they look....Clayton, do you know how many days per week Bruno did that routine?
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Lee Wong
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Alot of wrestlers aren't that strong today but look better than ever because of the heavy GH and synthol use. GH will spur size gains but is limited in strength gains. Synthol is strictly cosmetic and will do absolutely nothing for strength. They finally invented something where you can get muscles and don't have to work out for them.
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brainclaw33
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quote:
Originally posted by ClaytonMooreJr:
Heavy training does not ruin your joints, if you know what you are doing and take layoffs and train right. I am in my fifties and can still bench heavy, have no injuries or joint problems. Usually people abuse their body that by age 40, their joints are in bad shape. When you train in your 20's, you have to think if you want to train the same in way in your 40's. If you do, then you will think about these things.

Clayton, I wish I had had the sense that you did as a younger man. I'm younger than you, but I have already been told to avoid the weightroom because of joint problems, mainly in my shoulders. I am presently recovering from surgery (capsular shift in right shoulder) from 2 months ago, and will have the same procedure done on my left shoulder in the next year or so. All because I thought I was invincible when I was younger and didn't train wisely in the weightroom.


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ClaytonMooreJr
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quote:
Originally posted by MikeWest:
This is a fascinating thread..Ive always suspected that a lot of the bodybuilder-type wrestlers arent nearly as strong as they look....Clayton, do you know how many days per week Bruno did that routine?

Bruno trained on this routine twice per week. He stated when he did the 545 bench press with a two second pause he weighed 230 and was 23, which would have been around 1960. One year later while wrestling he picked up Haystacks Calhoun by the leg, lifted him up and dumped him to the canvas.


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Hammerlock-33
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Bruno is still in very good shape for his age. There was a picture of him without his shirt on in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about a year ago doing some DB curls with some 45s. He's a frequent guest on a local TV talkshow called NightTalk. People phone in and talk to him. He just made a move in Pittsburgh called Saloonatics. He plays an ailing mobster. There was an article in the Post-Gazette about it. He is still a legend here in Pittsburgh. My cousin saw him a couple of months ago at Lombardozzi's Restaurant in the Bloomfield section of Pittsburgh. He has always spoken out about the rampant steroid use in wrestling. A true natural, this is why he is still working out at 66 years of age.
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sav
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Clayton, I'm not sure if George Frenn is still alive. I still get Track & Field News and don't remember seeing an obit. I also recall a CNN story a few years ago where Frenn was competing in the ...I'm thinking for a way to say this so I don't get deleted...the "alternative lifestyle" olympics in both the hammer and weightlifting.
I worked out with both Bill "Peanuts" West and George Frenn. We use to cut jokes after our workouts. I was a young guy but very strong and they use to say "You really have potential". I later competed. I trained around them from 1967-1969 Bill West died awhile back I thought of a heart attack. I do not know about Frenn. George was a great hammer thrower and could really handle massive weights in side laterals with dumbells. In the early days, West was a great guy and always clowning. One workout I spotted him and he did 450 in the bench press, then he spotted me and I did 460.....The Original Gold's on Pacific Avenue in Venice was the home for powerlifters and bodybuilders during the 1960's. It was the greatest era to me after all these years. It was never crowded and we always saw people that came from all over the world to train or visit and see the great stars back then. Around 1968 one guy came in to Gold's and said "Can I join Vince Gironda just threw me out of his gym". Joe Gold replied why and he said "Because I would not stop doing heavy bench presses. Joe Gold said, "You have come to the right place for heavy training. All we require is for you to bring your sweat and desire".

[This message has been edited by ClaytonMooreJr (edited 04-05-2002).][/QUOTE]


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ron ripple
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Bruno has a gym in his home. Along with weight lifting (much lighter these days), he also jogs. When I lived in Pittsburgh (from 1954 - 1972), it was a thrill when Bruno and some other pro wrestlers attended one of our high school wrestling matches in 1970 (shortly before the end of his first WWWF title run). All of us pro wrestling marks easily spotted him.
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barry jordan
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Concerning S. OLIVIA, he was in the lucha libre movie EL PODER NEGRO (The Black Power).
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