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Author Topic: Meltzer's Ballot
Steve Yohe
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He reviewed everyone on the ballot in a real good Observer (10-23-17). This is what he wrote on Edge & Orton. If you want to read more subscribe to WON.

"Edge, to me, was a great performer. He was not a super individual draw, but more a cog in the wheel. In many ways, he reminds me of Ted DiBiase, although DiBiase was probably he better wrestler, but Edge still had more great matches than all but a few of his era. He was an excellent talker, part of memorable angles and had the ability to carry angles better than almost anyone, and carried Smackdown on his back. When you look at a list of most great matches and you see him so high on it, combined with his verbal skills, you get a strong total package performer. Still, I can’t objectively say that he stands out above everyone else on a ballot."

"Randy Orton is an interesting case. He has gotten minimal support so far even though for drawing, his numbers are far above Hall of Fame level, since from 2004 to 2009 his matches were well above what most were doing in the same position so dismissing him for the brand is the draw is okay in recent years but not the totality of his career. He’s a great worker, but having said that, his ability to go at a certain level and get by and knowing it has limited him compared to others who work harder but aren’t technically as good. I sense Orton is someone whose long-term will be more about how people judge him in ten years than now. Some, like Sting, were considered almost jokes on the ballot, getting no support, and later through nostalgia glasses people viewed him differently, and there was a longevity issue. Orton will probably work for a long time and have amazing tenure on top based no modern standards."

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Stephen Gennarelli
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Edge was an interesting, compelling character who made you keep watching, when no one else on the roster could do that. That makes him
extremely valuable and a standout performer of his era for sure.

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Wrestling Perspective
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quote:
Originally posted by OSJ from NM by way of WA:
quote:
Originally posted by Steve Yohe:
I do feel bad about voting for Weston. I met Apter & like him, but no. The sheets had more credibility than them. I knew it then & just speed read them. If they get voted in....ok...but I shouldn't have been part of it. I will never vote for them again.

Having writers & reporters is a good idea...if you can think of good legit ones. You need to be special at what you do to be in this hall. Just being the only guy around doesn't cut it.

You couldn't put everyone in the hall the first year. It's better to get voted in. Wahoo went thru the process, so everything is as it should. The system worked. It's needed because some people vote for guys like Stanley Weston & then realize the mistake. We need everyone to think things out to protect the hall from old goofy hippies like Yohe.---Steve Yohe

I don't know, Steve... The more I think about it, the more I actually think Weston belongs in. Yeah, as far as journalism goes, they were as phony as Penthouse Forum, but there's that "positive influence" clause that keeps coming to mind when I think about them. How else was a kid in Seattle going to learn anything at all about the WWWF, Florida, Texas, the AWA, even Los Angeles and San Francisco? We had the Vancouver B.C.-Seattle-Portland offices to follow, with Portland having the most consistent TV spots over the years and it was a hot enough territory that basically anybody who was anybody would cycle through there from time to time (except the guys that could really pick and choose their spots and didn't need to travel or were invested as part-owner or front office with their local fed.)

The PNW was a strong NWA territory until WCW killed it, so without the Weston mags, the Eastcoast guys working for the McMahons would have remained a complete mystery to us as would have other regional stars like the Sheik, Mil Mascaras, Dick the Bruiser etc.

On the whole, considering the era; I'd have to say that the Weston mags did a lot more good than they caused harm. Should Weston be considered a serious journalist? Of course not, but should he be considered a major "positive influence"? I'd have to say "yes!" Bubba Ho-Tep? [Big Grin]

I've been reading this with interest, as well as the article about the Weston mags that Steve posted.

They definitely played a part in publicizing pro wrestling and peaking interest. I keep thinking about how we used to read the magazines and look forward to them every month.

Yes, they were fiction.

Yes, they were making a buck off the business.

But, at least for some of us, they fulfilled an interest that no one else was -- the opportunity to read about wrestling in an era when there was virtually nothing written about wrestling in the mainstream publications because it "wasn't a sport" as we were told. For some of us, that increased our interest in the stories, the TV shows and the house shows.

David Skolnick wrote a piece for WP in the early '90s that explained how the guys at the Apter Mags (then published by London, I believe) designed the stories (brainstorm the headline, then write the story to it) and how a prolific writer could write several stories in a day, etc. I'd have to dig up story, but I recall it being a fun one.

So, I think the Weston publications occupy an interesting place. They used the business for their own gains, but I think the business also benefited from it as well. When I was first following wrestling as a kid and still believed in it, I can safely say they helped keep the fantasy fire burning brighter.

I also echo OSJ's point. I learned about the AWA and a lot of other promotions I was never going to see where I lived through those magazines. Also, it was very rare I would find a wrestling magazine other then a Weston publication, so they really were it. That may be a function of not growing up in a large market, I don't know.

HOF worthy? Would really need to spend more time thinking about it, but definitely worthy of HOF discussion.

Unless I'm mistaken, and I may be, Wrestling Eye, was the first newsstand wrestling publication I recall to "expose the business," sort of, with any degree of regularity via Ed Garea's Phantom of the Ring column.

[ 10-29-2017, 02:47 PM: Message edited by: Wrestling Perspective ]

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The Masked Knight
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I guess some won't vote for Weston because sone of his best sellers in the 70's weren't real pro wrestling stories/pics, but *apartment house wrestling* Bill Apter writes in his book about how unpopular Apartment House Wrestling was with the boys and how he took precautions to not bring mags with apartment wrestling on the covers into lockerrooms.

The boys considered themselves true athletes and performers and yet they were sharing cover space on the mags on newstands with strippers and hookers who were photographed pulling each other's clothes off in positions that made it look like wrestling. There were those who thought strongly that Weston demeaned the whole business with his years of AHW covers. Apter points out that AHW was all Weston's idea

[ 10-29-2017, 03:30 PM: Message edited by: The Masked Knight ]

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Wrestling Perspective
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quote:
Originally posted by The Masked Knight:
I guess some won't vote for Weston because his best sellers in the 70's weren't real pro wrestling stories/pics, but *apartment house wrestling* Bill Apter writes in his book about how unpopular Apartment House Wrestling was with the boys and how he took precautions to not have mags with apartment wrestling on the covers into lockerrooms.

The boys considered themselves true athletes and performers and yet they were sharing cover space on the mags on newstands with strippers and hookers who were photographed pulling each other's clothes off in positions that made it look like wrestling. There were those who thought strongly that Weston demeaned the whole business with his years or AHW covers

It's an interesting point worthy of debate for sure. How much does the association with exploitation features containing models, some who appeared in porn, in various staged sexualized poses, bring down the value of the contribution to the business? Or does it define the contribution to the business?

I remember the apartment house wrestling features in Sport Review Wrestling and I can't say they had a positive or negative impact about my opinion pro wrestling. I guess I just never took them that seriously. Again, I'm referring to how I thought of them when I was a kid buying the magazine, not as an adult looking back.

[ 10-29-2017, 02:58 PM: Message edited by: Wrestling Perspective ]

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Steve Ogilvie
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Looking back at the magazines now, The Ring magazine stands above the others with how it writes about wrestling. The Weston magazines did do a good job of promoting personalities on their covers.

Others that are worth discussing are The Wrestler from the UK , Lucha Libre form Mexico and Catch-Revue from Germany (I can barely read German but they did a lot of historical writing).

But I think if any magazines were going to be looked at it would be the Japanese publications (Weekly Pro Wrestling and Baseball Magazine Sha).

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