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» WrestlingClassics.com Message Board » Professional Wrestling Posts - July 07 thru 2010 » Tell me your USFL memories

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Author Topic: Tell me your USFL memories
bitplayer
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I'm not a big football fan but I kind of love hearing about the business of sports. I watched a documentary on the USFL and it looks like a great time to be a sports fan. Does anybody here who watched it miss it? Was it good enough to work or was it just badly managed. It looked like Trump kinda engineered it's downfall. I saw him with legendary scumbag lawyer Roy Cohen, geez. How about bad karma.

[ 02-28-2010, 02:46 PM: Message edited by: bitplayer ]

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diabolical brain-washington heights
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I remember an exciting game one time--the Boston Breakers had one come back or big playoff win or something. Johnny Walton was the QB, I liked him but had to look up his name to remember it [Smile]

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Pavlov's Dawg
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I miss it very much. Bad business decisions by a lot of the owners, not just Trump. Although Trump's decision to move to the Fall was probably the biggest mistake.

I was 14 when the USFL won the lawsuit-only to be awarded $1, and I knew what was going on even then. I lost all faith in the corrupt U.S. Justice Department that day. Obviously, it has gotten 100 times worse since then.

But the good memories of the league still out-way the bad for me. Imagine your favorite team merging with your best friends favorite team? Crazy & would never happen, right? But it happened to me when the Oakland Raiders merged with the Michigan Panthers in 1985.

My fav teams were the Oakland Invaders with Bobby Hebert & Anthony Carter & The Birmingham Stallions with Cliff Stoudt & Joe Cribbs.

[ 02-28-2010, 04:11 PM: Message edited by: Pavlov's Dawg ]

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PsychoSem
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Don't you mean Trump's decision to move FROM the spring in order to go head to head with the NFL?

quote:
Originally posted by Pavlov's Dawg:
I miss it very much. Bad business decisions by a lot of the owners, not just Trump. Although Trump's decision to move to the Spring was probably the biggest mistake.

I was 14 when the USFL won the lawsuit-only to be awarded $1, and I knew what was going on even then. I lost all faith in the corrupt U.S. Justice Department that day. Obviously, it has gotten 100 times worse since then.

But the good memories of the league still out-way the bad for me. Imagine your favorite team merging with your best friends favorite team? Crazy & would never happen, right? But it happened to me when the Oakland Raiders merged with the Michigan Panthers in 1985.

My fav teams were the Oakland Invaders with Bobby Hebert & Anthony Carter & The Birmingham Stallions with Cliff Stoudt & Joe Cribbs.



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stlbrodyfan
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The dual back attack of the 1984 New Jersey Generals! Both Hershal Walker and Maurice Carthon went over 1,000 yards! Not to mention Brian Sipe at QB!
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Pavlov's Dawg
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Yeah. I meant to say moving from spring to fall was a bad idea. Sorry about that.
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The Fake J.D. McKay
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I was Chief Engineer of WOAI and we had the San Antonio Gunslingers. We had to go to RFK stadium in DC and do the game up there. We won. That is the end of the good news. I spent the night before with Bill Mercer. Bad snore. BAD. Snore. So, it was like I didn't even have a nights sleep. We get up at 13 o'clock to head out to the stadium and get set up. I have 2 bags, each weighing about 30 pounds. Straight up, 72 steps to the top. And that was after carrying it across the parking lot and up to the concourse to get to the elevator to get us to the 72 steps. There was a bad mood rising. I hooked up the equipment back to the station. You would expect everything to work pretty well, considering that this is an NFL stadium. Yeah, right. Well, so far so good. "Jeff, test the referee's mic."

At this point in time, I will note that the ref's were exhausted from doing the Pop Warner game the night before. So I can understand them being a big off-kilter. So, I stuck my head out of the 1 1/2 foot door and yelled to the ref "TURN ON YOUR MIC!"

"WHUT?"

"TURN ON YOUR MIC!!!"

"HANG ON A MINUTE."

tic toc tic toc tic toc

Here I go, down the 72 stairs and saw the ref and told him to turn on the mic.

"What mic?"

Well, it just so happened that I looked down at the bench and saw the ref's mic. I put it on him and told him that I would yell at him when to turn it on. He said "OK".

Back up the 72 steps and I yelled "LET 'ER RIP, TATER CHIP". He turned it on. Nothing. Dead battery. I grabbed both AA and AAA's from my bag and headed back down 72 steps. I opened it up. Much to my surprise, it required a 9 v battery. Back up the 72 steps, back down again. I put the battery. I checked the battery and the light was on this time and I got audio over the stadium PA. OK. Now we are getting somewhere.

72 steps back up to the top I sit next to Bill Mercer and Jay Howard (P by P man for WOAI.) We are doing pregame checks and now it came time to check the ref's mic into our mixer. "TURN ON THE MIC".

All over the stadium we hear "Check 12. Testing 123. Testicles 123." Then I cannot believe what I am about to hear. Jay Howard says "no audio from the ref's mic." I checked the feed from PA booth and it was clean. I asked the guy in the PA booth where did we get the feed into the booth. He said "down there." Yep. You guessed it. 72 steps down, it was somewhere behind the bench. I went down and the wiring looked like a 5 year old had done it. I put it together in a very, shall we say, TIGHT fashion. We are doing quite well until we get about half way through the first quarter.

"HEY JEFF! REF'S MIC IS OUT".

72 steps down to the bench area. It seems the Junior Miss that they had for a cheerleader was doing one of her moves and her foot got tangled in the telephone wire that fed the radio booth. She was very nice and sweet and so I let her off with a warning. My warning was that if she came within a camel's hump of that wire again I would be mean. Or something like that. Game over. Down 72 steps with 1/2 of the equipment for the locker room interviews. I was exhausted, but I was happy that this mess was over. Except for one iddy biddy thing. The rest of the equipment. I had to climb back up 72 steps to the top of RFK so that I could collect the other 70 pounds of the equipment.

End of story? No. We ran into heavy storms in this piece of Clinton Manges garbage that was referred to as an airplane. UP and DOWN...UP and DOWN...UP and DOWN. I got home about 2 am with the worst sinus infection you can imagine. I finally went to the doctor with it. It seems that this fellow missed the day that they covered "how to treat sinus infections". I went back twice before my assistant told me of an old Mexican legendary homeopathic remedy. Nachos with extremely hot Jalapeno's. I had my first ex-wife pick up the remedy on her way home. I ate the remedy and let me tell you, that remedy opened up holes where they didn't exist before. I guess that would be the end of the story, except for one little thing. That doctor I used on sinuses was not any better on the after effects of the jalapeno therapy, which basically was like having sulfuric acid ran through your digestive tract. I did, however, have the homeopathic remedy for the digestive tract...called Blue Bell Ice Cream. No chocolate, no whooped cream, just Blue Bell straight.

Now. I believe that the original question was about the USFL. I was not a huge fan, thank you.

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BlackTigerSplx
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I was a HUGE USFL fan. At least that first year. Still have the Boston Breakers pennant around here somewhere. I was crushed when they moved to New Orleans, but they had no place to play here; they played at Nickerson Field at Boston University, and the seating was about 20,000. I don't think they ever sold out. Went to a couple of games, and they were fun. Johnnie Walton was a talented black QB and he was about 37. He had a cannon. Flea flickers, rollouts...it was wide open football.

It was a decent league overall. The D was a bit shaky, but it was a good alternative to the NFL, and since my Pats were crappy in 83, it was something new to this 15 year older. I liked it. Too bad Trump got involved, once that happened, it killed the league balance moneywise. But I have good memories. Jim Kelly was a beast there with the Houston Gamblers. 5000 yards passing in 84.

Here's a good site on the USFL.
http://www.remembertheusfl.8m.com/

Black Tiger

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RedStorm
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Steve Young signed a 10 year, $40 million contract with the LA Express in 1984. In order to help the finances of the league, he agreed to take the money in the form of a 40-year annuity, for which he is still collecting. In 2027 he will receive his last payment of $3.173 million.

Smart move on his part.

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Philly Sports Fan
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My favorite was the first season. The Philadelphia Stars were undefeated, and finally lost their first game to the Boston Breakers at Nicholson Field, and the fans stormed the field as if Boston College just beat Nebraska for the national championship, and there was a camera shot of Stars head coach Jim Mora walking off the field with a big smile on his face.

The Stars lost the championship to the Michigan Panthers, but then beat the Arizona Wranglers the next year, but there was no parade. The team was losing money and drawing very poorly, so they moved to Baltimore and won the championship there again.

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Philly Sports Fan
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quote:
Originally posted by RedStorm:
Steve Young signed a 10 year, $40 million contract with the LA Express in 1984. In order to help the finances of the league, he agreed to take the money in the form of a 40-year annuity, for which he is still collecting. In 2027 he will receive his last payment of $3.173 million.

Smart move on his part.

The team is still around to pay it? I thought they'd go bankrupt and not have to pay the guy.

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Philly Sports Fan
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quote:
Originally posted by Pavlov's Dawg:
I miss it very much. Bad business decisions by a lot of the owners, not just Trump. Although Trump's decision to move to the Fall was probably the biggest mistake.

I was 14 when the USFL won the lawsuit-only to be awarded $1, and I knew what was going on even then. I lost all faith in the corrupt U.S. Justice Department that day. Obviously, it has gotten 100 times worse since then.

The reason the USFL decided to move to the Fall was to strengthen their case that the NFL was trying to run them out of business. It was too little, too late, sad to say.

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1000 Masks But No Jobs
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quote:
Originally posted by Suicidal Philly Sports Fan:
quote:
Originally posted by RedStorm:
Steve Young signed a 10 year, $40 million contract with the LA Express in 1984. In order to help the finances of the league, he agreed to take the money in the form of a 40-year annuity, for which he is still collecting. In 2027 he will receive his last payment of $3.173 million.

Smart move on his part.

The team is still around to pay it? I thought they'd go bankrupt and not have to pay the guy.
I didn't know about Steve Young agreeing to an annuity on his $40 million contract with the Express. But I would strongly think that the team would pay the entire cost of the annuity up front. Why would any player ever agree to such a deal if thre was even the slightest chance a team or league could go belly up and not pay the total amount?

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SWW72 from FL
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I loved the USFL. I still have every pennant from the teams from years one and two. I loved the Monay night games on ESPN.

A huge memory of mine was an exhibition game I went to in Fort Lauderdale when I was a junior in high school. It was the Washington Federals vs. the Tampa Bay Bandits. South Florida was intent on getting a team, which they had already planned to call The Heat (the basketball team didn't exist yet). The possibility of a South Florida team would eventually have a major impact on the Miami Hurricanes as Howard Schnellenberger was hired as the first coach of the South Florida team and Jimmy Johnson was hired as his replacement at UM.

Anyway, back to the game. A friend of mine and I went to the game and we came up with this elaborate plan in case of the impossibility that a ball came into the stands and we were able to get it. Of course the chances of that were almost zero. The game was a sell out and I think it was dominated by the Bandits. Halfway through the fourth quarter the crowd thinned out. Our seats were in the west end zone but we walked all the way over to the east end zone as the action was moving that way. One of the teams scored and it was time for the extra point. Unbelievably, half of the net behind the goal post got snagged on something and didn't go up and the ball made it into the crowd from the PAT. Somehow my friend came up with it and our plan sprung into action. He headed to the top of the stadium and I ran down toward the exit, passing security on the way who was rushing up to get the ball back. I left the stadium and went to the endzone side where we just had been. My friend was on the top row seats, looked down, saw me and threw the ball over the edge of the stadium where I was waiting and caught it on one bounce. I put it under my shirt, found our car, and put it into the trunk.

We planned on splitting possession of the ball. I kept it for a few weeks and then it was his turn. I'm not sure how long it was before he ended up playing with it on the street, totally ruining it. I'll bet it would be worth something today.

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SWW72

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Philly Sports Fan
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quote:
Originally posted by 1000 Masks But No Jobs:
quote:
Originally posted by Suicidal Philly Sports Fan:
quote:
Originally posted by RedStorm:
Steve Young signed a 10 year, $40 million contract with the LA Express in 1984. In order to help the finances of the league, he agreed to take the money in the form of a 40-year annuity, for which he is still collecting. In 2027 he will receive his last payment of $3.173 million.

Smart move on his part.

The team is still around to pay it? I thought they'd go bankrupt and not have to pay the guy.
I didn't know about Steve Young agreeing to an annuity on his $40 million contract with the Express. But I would strongly think that the team would pay the entire cost of the annuity up front. Why would any player ever agree to such a deal if thre was even the slightest chance a team or league could go belly up and not pay the total amount?
That is what is confusing me. Unless the Express were owned by some blazillionaire who was honorable enough to keep paying Young.

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1000 Masks But No Jobs
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quote:
Originally posted by Suicidal Philly Sports Fan:
quote:
Originally posted by 1000 Masks But No Jobs:
quote:
Originally posted by Suicidal Philly Sports Fan:
quote:
Originally posted by RedStorm:
Steve Young signed a 10 year, $40 million contract with the LA Express in 1984. In order to help the finances of the league, he agreed to take the money in the form of a 40-year annuity, for which he is still collecting. In 2027 he will receive his last payment of $3.173 million.

Smart move on his part.

The team is still around to pay it? I thought they'd go bankrupt and not have to pay the guy.
I didn't know about Steve Young agreeing to an annuity on his $40 million contract with the Express. But I would strongly think that the team would pay the entire cost of the annuity up front. Why would any player ever agree to such a deal if thre was even the slightest chance a team or league could go belly up and not pay the total amount?
That is what is confusing me. Unless the Express were owned by some blazillionaire who was honorable enough to keep paying Young.
Not to be snarky here, but I would think the team would just pay the money up front to a third party, such as an insurance company, who would then administer the yearly payments. That would seem to be the only way any player would ever take the deal, or any agent would even allow a player to take such a deal.

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sharms
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I was part of the radio broadcast for the Denver Gold. For the first two seasons Denver led the league in attendance....a fact not lost on ABC which forced the USFL to hold its first championship game at Mile Hi Stadium in Denver.

The Gold was a fun team with Red Miller, Craig Morton and Mouse Davis as their three head coaches. Mouse Davis is often credited with the creation of the Run and Shoot offense which was a lot of fun to watch.

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Arnold_OldSchool
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https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DmNPDeJU0AAs3RK.jpg

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DmNPDeRUcAALIW4.jpg

Trump asking USFL owners to pay for Doug Flutie's contract.

And in reply, another owner declares he's going to punch Trump in the face.

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The Kotto Conundrum
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Was a HUGE Flutie fan. It was a huge deal to see him trying his hand at the pros after the scuttlebutt with him coming out of BC was that he was just too small.

And it was kinda heartbreaking (I was like 11 years old) to see that folks were right to be skeptical--he just wasn't very good at that point in time.

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The Mighty Wilbur
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I would have loved for Bassett to carry out his threat.

I was never a Flutie fan. Then I met him. I am a shade over 5'8", and Doug was slightly shorter than me - we both had sneakers on.

Playing in the NFL at that size won my respect.

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MW

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